ORDRE Weekly

In this week's roundup: the links between sustainability and colonialism; why luxury brands still hire Chief Digital Officers; the big business of second-hand clothes and more

  • UNDERSTANDING SUSTAINABILITY MEANS TALKING ABOUT COLONIALISM
  • WHY LUXURY BRANDS STILL HIRE CHIEF DIGITAL OFFICERS
  • LUXURY MAISONS ARE NOT ABANDONING BRICK-AND-MORTAR ANYTIME SOON
  • MOBILE MAGNATES


LESS SELECTION WILL DEFINE RETAIL IN 2018

Retail Dive 

"Less selection and higher quality are emerging as differentiators for smaller brands entering a crowded retail market that has many consumers seeking a curated product offering that cuts through the "paradox of choice".

 

UNDERSTANDING SUSTAINABILITY MEANS TALKING ABOUT COLONIALISM

The Cut

"Sustainability is focused on one small part of the problem, while ignoring most of the larger important global issues. Sustainability is a spectrum, and doing less damage is still doing some damage. So you can’t solve sustainability by simply buying things. The game here is about reduction of harm, not binary solutions."



WHY LUXURY BRANDS STILL HIRE CHIEF DIGITAL OFFICERS

Digiday

“Companies struggle with digital transformation because the scope of change is massive and often very disruptive,” said study lead and Gartner analyst Mark Raskino. “However, CEOs are under pressure from boards and external stakeholders to drive the digital future.”



RETAIL SPENDING ON AI TO REACH $7.3B BY 2022

Retail Dive

"In coming years, retailers will spend heavily on AI tools that will enable them to differentiate and improve the services they offer customers. These will include automated marketing platforms that generate tailored, timely offers, and chatbots that provide instant customer service."

 

LUXURY MAISONS ARE NOT ABANDONING BRICK-AND-MORTAR ANYTIME SOON

South China Morning Post

"Luxury brands are establishing institutions, workshops, retail spaces and museums to keep customers in touch with their heritage and savoir-faire"



MOBILE MAGNATES: TRADING SECOND-HAND CLOTHES HAS BECOME BIG BUSINESS AMONG THE YOUNG

1843 Magazine

"Twenty-two years after the launch of eBay, an industry has developed around the online resale of clothes. Data are thin, but ThredUP, a fashion resale website, estimates the value of the “recommerce” market, as it is delicately known, at $18bn in America; IBISWorld reckons it is worth around £700m in Britain. Second hand no longer means bargain. At the luxury end of the spectrum, Vestiaire Collective, founded in 2009, allows people to sell their last-season Chanel and Prada; Rebelle, a German company founded in 2013, even provides a concierge service, which evaluates, wraps and dispatches the clothes for you."



LUXURY SHOPPING ONLINE UP FIVEFOLD, STILL GROWING FAST

WWD

"Led by Millennials, shopping for luxury products is on the rise, with no signs of slowing."